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GO SAIL CARGO

ELECTRIC CLIPPER 74

The Clipper 64 has evolved into a bigger faster ship, more cargo and more spacious, she is now the Clipper 74.

— A tough 40-tonne sailing cargo passenger ship for zero emission trading, custom designed for the job.

— An efficient, easily handled yet powerful ketch rig.

— A crew of 3 + 4 passengers

— A powerful electric motor with lithium or graphene supercapacitor battery banks.

— Solar plus propeller charging with back up diesel generator for safety.

— Separate passenger accommodation for two with their own galley, head, and shower.

— Shallow 1.6-metre draught to go where few other cargo boats dare.

— A flat bottom with bilge keels to take the ground safely.

— Wonderfully versatile cargo options from a 20-foot container to stacked pallets to container-sized accommodation units – passenger modules or pretty much anything.

— Gaff crane on board to load and unload up to five tonnes each swing.

— Every component of the vessel is designed for a long, low maintenance lifespan.

— A five-passenger sailing dinghy with one pallet capacity and electric auxiliary is stowed in davits.

THE SLIDES



THE SHIP DESIGN

Our Electric Clipper 74 follows on from the Electric Clipper 100 and incorporates the essential design principles established in that ship. Briefly, we sought to create a tough, efficient and cost effective sailing ship that drew on time honoured working rigs yet embraced new but tried and tested technology. We opted for a steel hull as it is clearly the best option for a small cargo ship and can be repaired pretty much anywhere. We took great care with the hull lines though – the 74 may be a bit barge like but it won't be slow or cumbersome – far from it. While considerably smaller than the Electric Clipper 100, the 74 is just as capable and just as versatile. Various cargo/passenger combinations are available including the new “bus” modules.

THE “BUS” MODULE

The bus module systems enable up to 26 passengers to be safely transported in a 20-foot container-sized module. This unit is fabricated in aluminium and is fitted in the hold over removable steel joists. The unit is craned on to the wharf and up to 10 pallets of cargo are then stowed underneath. The steel joists are slotted in and the passenger module craned back on board and secured. Passengers can then be embarked and excess luggage is stowed in front of the unit. More luggage or freight is stowed under the side decks. Up to 6 extra passengers can be seated in the passenger cabin below where there is a head, a shower, and a galley. Perfect for inter-island trading.

THE SAILS

THE LOOSE FOOTED MAIN

The 74 incorporates a loose footed mainsail with a brailing line. This sail has its roots in UK work boats such as Thames Barges and Bawleys. On the 74 an extra long gaff in carbonfibre is used. The spar has integral tracks to take an electric pulley with a one-tonne capacity. The main is sheeted in barge style, on to a full-width traveller. Vangs – separate “sheets” to the gaff are rigged to control the spar and sail shape. A carbonfibre whisker pole is also used on longer downwind fetches. A similar spar can also be set to windward for the jib or genoa.

A brailing line is fitted to instantly gather up the sail to de-power the rig.

THE “HAMMOCK”

New to sailing is a revolutionary downwind sail we call the “hammock”. It’s a completely new kind of squaresail, set from the bowsprit end using the genoa halyard. The sail features a carbonfibre “boom” at the foot, controlled by two braces. The sail is a full cut spinnaker with an extra wide peak, hanked to the outer forestay. A brailing line is used to gather up the sail when setting or taking in.

THE MIZZEN STAYSAIL

As with the Electric Clipper 100, the mizzen staysail tack is shackled either side of the cargo hold coaming. This sail can be centred over the cargo using a bridle for upwind work.

THE MIZZEN

The mizzen itself has electric roller furling with quick release mast hoop attachments and a winch handle in case of power failure.

THE TOPSAIL

I have drawn in what is technically a yard topsail. Once up there the main can still be quickly depowered and when working rivers the topsail is often the only one drawing efficiently.

THE MASTS

The Clipper 74 can be fitted with lowering masts secured in tabernacles for shooting low bridges. This facility dramatically increases their ability to reach upriver destinations.

THE CREW

The Electric Clipper 74 is designed to be manned by a crew of 3, just as the (larger) Thames Barges were but 2 extra passengers are quartered in the fo'c'sle to help sail the ship on longer voyages.

THE SHIP’S BOAT

The 74 has a new ship’s boat. This one is a new GRP version of our best selling Shimmy 12. The boat will take 5 (or 6 at a pinch) and features a shallower keel with an integral centreboard for windward work under sail.

The Shimmy II has a simple yet effective standing lug rig and will be rowed or carry a 2HP electric outboard. Even the ship’s boat is zero emission, the batteries are plugged in to the ship’s generating system and there's a solar panel on the cover.

SPECIFICATIONS

HULL
Steel
WHEELHOUSE
Aluminium
MASTS
Timber or aluminium
YARDS
Aluminium, carbonfibre or bamboo
LOA
22.7 metres   74’6”
BEAM
5.6 metres   18’3”
LWL
20.3 metres    66’6”
BALLAST
Fixed keel ballast 8 tonnes + water ballast
DRAUGHT LOADED
1.8 metres   6’(2.4metres boards down)
RIG
Gaff Ketch with loose footed main, yard topsail,
squaresail and hammock. Both masts lower
FORE/AFT SAIL AREA
165 sq metres (working sail)
SQUARESAILS
35 sq metres
STAYSAILS
1 x 24 sq metres + 1 x 15.7 sq metres
STORM JIB
15.7 sq metres
GENNAKER
70 sq metres
CREW
3
PASSENGERS
4
CARGO
1 x high-cube 20’ container + 12 x pallets
and breakbulk cargo to 40 tonnes
ENGINES
1 x 40 kW electric motor + propeller regeneration
GENERATOR
1 x 9.5 kW diesel
BATTERIES
Lithium ion or graphene supercapacitor
SOLAR ARRAY
4 kW
TOP SPEED
11+ knots (8 knots under power)
DESIGNER
Derek Ellard


"When the wind of change blows, some build walls, others build windmills."

— Chinese proverb

"We build sailing ships."

— Go Sail Cargo


CONTACT

Contact Derek Ellard derek@scruffie.com



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